Archive for Fred Garnett

I Want To Hold Your Hand & Going Global

Posted in Beatles in 12 Songs, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 10, 2013 by fred6368

The Beatles in Twelve Songs (2)

It was 50 years go today that the Beatles taught America to play, with the biggest prime-time TV show audience ever (73 million viewers) on the Ed Sullivan show, February 9th 1964. In the UK I Want To Hold Your Hand had been the cherry on the cake of their annus mirabilis 1963 where it went to Number One in the charts by knocking off their own She Loves You, which had been in the Top 3 ever since it was released, and had just returned to the top after Beatlemania had gone national. In the USA I Want To Hold Your Hand popped a nations cherry and they laid down begging for the first British Invasion since 1812. This is how The Beatles woke them up and how America succumbed

Surprising huh? Quite a flat performance of a song tooled by McCartney to be a hit single written specifically to break the American market whilst he was living in the house of his girlfriend Jane Asher. Asher’s father was a Harley Street doctor, and her musical mum, Margaret Elliott, was a Professor at the Guildhall School of Music where she had taught producer George Martin the oboe. Frustrated by Capitol Records not promoting, or even releasing, early Beatles singles, manager Brian Epstein had asked Lennon and McCartney to write a song specifically to be a hit in the USA, and it was Paul who did. Jane’s brother Peter Asher was the first to hear the song, played on piano, as his room was opposite Paul’s  at 57 Wimpole Street London. This is what a made to order US hit record sounds like

Peter Asher’s bedroom proved to be amazingly strategically placed. He became good friends with McCartney, showing him round London and later became head of Apple Records, signing James Taylor with whom he Continue reading

Beatles Albums 1964-65

Posted in Beatles History, Open Context Model of Learning with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 19, 2010 by fred6368

Beatles Creativity Phase Three; Album Artists

By the summer of 1964 The Beatles had used up all that their ears had taught them as an audience-responsive live band and recycled it back creatively as a pop singles machine. They had answered demands for a UK number one, an American number one, a movie theme tune, a classic rock n roll EP and had accidentally invented the modern rock album when they delivered the Hard Days Night soundtrack album with extra tracks, all written by Lennon and McCartney. The studious Beatles however were bored and Lennon entered his ‘fat Elvis’ period doubting the value of fame and “writing every day.”  And then Bob Dylan turned up. Bob Dylan had been blown away by the endless stream of Beatles hit records on the radio when he was driving across Colorado in the Spring of 1964 and their driving rock was to influence him and the rise of folk-rock. But the influence was mutual. George had bought Dylan’s second album Freewheelin’, played it constantly and persuaded Paul and John of its value. They met him at New York’s Delmonico’s on August 28th 1964 and Paul discovered the seven levels. Dylan’s immediate impact can be heard in John’s lyrics, tone and harmonica I’m A Loser; Continue reading

A Beatles Live! Show; London 1962

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2010 by fred6368

Young Bloods

Following on from the history of The Beatles Live 1957-63 which looked at how John, Paul, George and Ringo came together, this post contains a simulation of what a great Beatles live show with Ringo might have sounded like. You can hear it as a YouTube Playlist called A Beatles Live Show 1962. I am imagining that it is in London, England in late 1962 before they had a real hit single with Please Please Me but when Love Me Do was the highlight of their show; as recommended by Beatles fan Deni Lavender. 1-2-3-4! Live!! The Beatles!!! I Saw Her Standing There;

Roll Over Beethoven; I can’t seem to find any real recordings in London in late 1962 but I have taken the advice of Deni who saw them live many time between 1962 and 1964 in London. So here is George to the fore on the legendary Ready Steady Go! TV Show. This was Hip Swinging London beamed out to the British provinces so that we could all share in Beatlemania. But their live show still contained many of their 1962 live numbers and this was a staple. Authentic screams over an authentic live performance of Chuck Berry’s Roll Over Beethoven;

Continue reading

Beatles Singles 1962-64

Posted in Beatles History, Open Context Model of Learning with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2010 by fred6368

Beatles Creativity Phase Two; Singles Men

Trevor Horn, who in November 1963 was inspired to become a producer when he noticed the difference between the Beatles error-strewn live performance on the Royal Variety Show compared to the exuberant polish of their studio songs, observed that there is always one weak member of a group when it comes to recording; which is why he says he never recorded U2.  George Martin thought the same with Pete Best and, sadly, I think that Pete was a live rock n roll drummer and not cut out for the studio work supporting the song that Ringo delivered at Abbey Road; here are The Beatles trying to find their recording feet whilst auditioning with Pete Best on Love Me Do;   Continue reading

Beatles Live 1957-1963

Posted in Beatles History, Open Context Model of Learning, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 1, 2010 by fred6368

The Six Phases of Beatles Creativity (1) Outlier Outlaws

How did The Beatles come into existence, and how come they were so creative? Using the six phases of creativity identified on 9 after 909 I will use YouTube videos to try to explain this online. The first period I will look at,  1957-1963, is the same period as that identified by Malcolm Gladwell when The Beatles were Outliers, or unknown unknowns, and in the process of self-creation. The pre-Fab Four were such Outlaws that they had to travel to, and work in, Hamburg’s red light district to make their music during 1960-62, the most significant part of this time. Bob Spitz in The Beatles The Biography identifies the Litherland Hall Concert in Liverpool on December 27 1960, after the Beatles returned from Hamburg in black leather, as the point at which they became legends in their own backyard. Nice short film about Litherland made by their manager of the time Allan Williams. But even legends started small and The Beatles started as The Quarrymen. Here they are with Buddy Holly’s That’ll Be The Day Continue reading