Archive for the George Harrison Category

George Harrison on the BBC

Posted in George Harrison with tags , , , , , on November 11, 2011 by fred6368

Living in the Material World

Martin Scorsese’s marvellous 2-part documentary on George Harrison, Living In The Material World, aired on the BBC in the Arena Arts documentary series. Part One, up until 1969, was on Saturday November 12th at 9.45 on BBC2. If you like The Beatles this is as good a documentary on their career as any film made so far, even Anthology, lasts for 95 minutes, and George is still a Beatle at the end of it.  

Living in the Material World Pt2; Showed on Sunday November 13th at 9.00pm because it is 2 hours and 5 minutes long and covers all of George’s solo career. I saw the show at FACT in Liverpool and was really impressed by Scorsese’s work in presenting old material afresh, getting original interviews and finding out-takes that had been missed or ignored. I reviewed it positively here, Continue reading

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Living in the Material World

Posted in George Harrison with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 5, 2011 by fred6368

Martin does George a Treat

Martin Scorsese’s film about George Harrison, Living in the Material World, is a beautifully crafted confection of refreshingly unused archive footage alongside material that you know so well you’ve forgotten how to look at it. Scorsese grabs the material by the scruff of its visual neck and makes you marvel at it again; retelling afresh that wondrous tale about scouse upstarts from the provinces changing the world. It showed on HBO in the USA on October 5th & 6th, on BBC 2 Arena in the Autumn and has just been released on DVD and you should see it.

Just like No Direction Home(!) featuring Bob Dylan, Scorsese presents an old story using old material with intelligence and movie smarts, fired by his own passion for the music and personal affection for the protagonists. Allied with his long-established ability to create memorable musical documentaries, well he was a cameraman at Woodstock, he choreographs George’s own Last Waltz with skilful edits, unexpected links and new interviews. Scorsese has found unseen outtakes and previously rejected photographic stills, and links them to well-known clips of the Beatles where he often zooms in so tightly on them playing live that he creates a kind of grainy simulation of 3D, adding an unexpected immediacy to old stock. With both Harrison’s and the Beatles music digitally re-mastered he makes sure that the sound is fresh and loud, allowing him to present George Harrison to us anew, both visually and aurally, opening out fresh interpretations of the ‘quiet Beatle; quiet blunt apparently. 

Revealing interviews from Astrid Kirchherr, Klaus Voorman, Patti Boyd and especially Eric Clapton (“of course I wanted Continue reading

Beatle George

Posted in George Harrison with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 24, 2011 by fred6368

Here Comes George Harrison

The Group Genius known as TheBeatles means John, Paul, George & Ringo acting together in harmony to create and record great music. They became recording artists of distinction when, with the support of George Martin, they got their group songwriting, arranging and recording right with Please, Please Me; with the help of their friends. George Martin was moved to say, “gentlemen you have just recorded your first number 1.’ Curiously they had most of these elements in place, including three part harmonies, five years earlier when George Harrison passed the audition with Lennon on a bus back in 1957 by playing Raunchy. I first heard him in 1963 when a friend played me the Beatles first album Please Please Me and George sang Do You Want to Know a Secret?  

Back then we knew George as the lead guitarist in the breakthrough MerseyBeat group the Beatles; so we looked to what he was interested in as a guitarist. But George was unusual as a lead guitarist, he didnt play lead guitar lines, like Hank Marvin in the Shadows or, his later best friend, Eric Clapton in Cream. He played lead guitar in songs and helped amplify the quality of Lennon and McCartney compositions. And, just like John and Paul, he spent the fifties in love with Rock and Roll and, like them, helped overturn the classics. There is a playlist of this post on YouTube and this video has great pix of George; based on a live recording at the BBC with an interview by Alan ‘Fluff’ Freeman. George can Roll Over Beethoven;   Continue reading